Vintage Tumblr Themes

Ambiance and elegance from my quiet alcove
Will sell soul for a good book and an espresso

study-hack:

A Visual guide to note-taking systems: The Cornell Method, Outlining, Mapping and Charting

study-hack:

A Visual guide to note-taking systems: The Cornell Method, Outlining, Mapping and Charting

studybuddyspo:

Tips on Getting Started
I haven’t seen many of these on any blog sites, so I decided to make my own post about this subject and what helps me get started on things I need to do.
 
1.    Start off tiny. If you need your bedroom clean, start by picking up a piece of crumpled paper off of the floor. If you need to read a book, just read a paragraph or even two sentences.
2.    Promise yourself x minutes to do this. Time has a way with us, especially the time-conscious ones like myself. If you don’t give yourself a guideline to when you should stop, you’ll feel discouraged to start because you’ll never know when it will end. If you give yourself fifteen minutes (or even five)—not a daunting amount of time—to, say, study, it will look more appealing to you. But remember: Do nothing but that. You can’t do anything else. Sometimes you’ll even go further than that fifteen minutes because, by then, your mind will be locked into that task. Don’t promise yourself you will get locked down, but promise that it’ll only last a short while.
3.    Take your time. With whatever it is, make sure you do it right. You don’t want to quickly read three pages of your textbook only to find out you haven’t absorbed anything at all. Sure, you can say you studied for 5 hours, but was it really studying?
4.    Don’t argue with yourself. You know what you should be doing, so why come up with a shit ton of excuses to not do it? We can go on about how capitalist society sucks and how tired we all are. At the end of the day, is it going to get done? With that attitude, I don’t think so.

studybuddyspo:

Tips on Getting Started

I haven’t seen many of these on any blog sites, so I decided to make my own post about this subject and what helps me get started on things I need to do.

 

1.    Start off tiny. If you need your bedroom clean, start by picking up a piece of crumpled paper off of the floor. If you need to read a book, just read a paragraph or even two sentences.

2.    Promise yourself x minutes to do this. Time has a way with us, especially the time-conscious ones like myself. If you don’t give yourself a guideline to when you should stop, you’ll feel discouraged to start because you’ll never know when it will end. If you give yourself fifteen minutes (or even five)—not a daunting amount of time—to, say, study, it will look more appealing to you. But remember: Do nothing but that. You can’t do anything else. Sometimes you’ll even go further than that fifteen minutes because, by then, your mind will be locked into that task. Don’t promise yourself you will get locked down, but promise that it’ll only last a short while.

3.    Take your time. With whatever it is, make sure you do it right. You don’t want to quickly read three pages of your textbook only to find out you haven’t absorbed anything at all. Sure, you can say you studied for 5 hours, but was it really studying?

4.    Don’t argue with yourself. You know what you should be doing, so why come up with a shit ton of excuses to not do it? We can go on about how capitalist society sucks and how tired we all are. At the end of the day, is it going to get done? With that attitude, I don’t think so.

rivendellbitch:

originally-remarkable:

rivendellbitch:

And I noticed something…

so this is the first time we see the king of Atlantis, right? 

image

Then he says this while his wife is drawn into the heart of Atlantis:

image

Notice how he’s not looking away. The next time we see the king, he is blind.

image

DOES THIS MEAN HE LOOKED INTO THE HEART OF ATLANTIS, RISKED LOSING HIS SIGHT, JUST SO HE COULD SEE HIS WIFE ONE LAST TIME??????

JUST FUCKING STOP RIGHT THERE

CANT STOP WONT STOP

yesbreathingisnice:

he looks so pleased with himself and that makes me happy

yesbreathingisnice:

he looks so pleased with himself and that makes me happy

thetallblacknerd:

I loved this speech so fucking much, just agree with all of it

standwithpalestine:

Israeli settlers - who live illegally on Palestinian land and shouldn’t be there in the first place - regularly destroy and uproot olive trees belonging to Palestinians, often striking at night to go unnoticed.

Olive trees are a livelihood for many families, and a key component of the Palestinian economy. That’s how they are meant to survive. 

These attacks are by no means limited to agriculture. They also burn and vandalize churchesmosques, homescars and… cemeteries

I saved the worst for last. Israeli soldiers escort Israeli settlers to attack Palestinians then stand by and watch, if not join in too

According to the UN the annual rate of Israeli settler attacks against Palestinians has almost quadrupled in eight years.

GIFs from 5 Broken Cameras (2011)

studyforthata:

Summer holidays are the perfect time to prepare for the next year or revise last year’s stuff, so put that time to good use and work! But don’t forget to drink enough and have fun, you’re on holiday after all! 
Get started:
Make a Schedule
Make a Summer Study Schedule
Block Websites here or here
Different ways to do buns (because I like to have my hair out of my face when I’m studying)
Instrumental Music:
Eat. Sleep. Study. Repeat.
Study Buddy
Study Mix I
Survival kit to finals
Concentration Part One  Part Two  Part Three
Study With Accompaniment I    II    III
Instrumental Mega Mix
and 
Coffitivity
Sounddrown
Rainymood
Free Textbooks:
Textbook Revolution
Mostly Science and Maths textbooks
Fullbooks
epubbud
Textbooknova
Reddit
bookboon
Ebookee
Freebookspot
Free e-books
Bookfi
Oerconsortium
Project Gutenberg (there are also books in German, French and Portugese)
Subjects:
How do I study for…
simplified Physics equations
learn Geography
Khan academy
Music Theory
Science Videos
Periodic Table Song
practice Math problems
learn a new language
simple free learning tools
Food:
Cookie Recipes
Cookie in a mug
Healthy Smoothies
Big list of healthy recipes
Healthy Study Snacks
Quick and easy snacks
more healthy study snacks
Starbucks recipes
I hope this was helpful, message me if you have question or a link isn’t working !

studyforthata:

Summer holidays are the perfect time to prepare for the next year or revise last year’s stuff, so put that time to good use and work! But don’t forget to drink enough and have fun, you’re on holiday after all! 

Get started:

Instrumental Music:

and 

Free Textbooks:

Subjects:

Food:

I hope this was helpful, message me if you have question or a link isn’t working !

study-hack:

image

My freshman year of college didn’t go too well for several reasons.

One, I had no idea what I was getting into: how the classes go, how to prepare for them, how to set a schedule, etc.

Two, I didn’t know how to study. I tried so many different things, different…

youvejustbeengilmored:

The truth in this is palpable.

youvejustbeengilmored:

The truth in this is palpable.

cognitivedefusion:

scienceofeds:

cognitivedefusion:

scienceofeds:


Behar, E., DiMarco, I. D., Hekler, E. B., Mohlman, J., & Staples, A. M. (2009). Current theoretical models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): Conceptual review and treatment implications. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 23, 1011-1023.

This is so hard for me to believe, for some reason. Why would thinking verbally move faster than thinking through imagery? (I know I should just read the paper. I might actually do that, hah.)

Think of it this way: in your head, describe your bedroom with words. It’s likely you’ll move through each characteristic quickly because you need to get to the next part. Bed, paint, mirror, dresser, whatever. One thing to the next, and so because you are going part-by-part you get less time to devote to each part.
Or, imagine your bedroom as an image. This way you can visually see everything, so you are not jumping from one part to the next. You can sit with each piece (in unison) for longer. You don’t have to think of one part and then the next and so on, but you can see the bed, paint, mirror, dresser, etc. all as one unit.
Does that make any more sense? The main thing is that, with images, it’s easier to spot where the line of thinking starts to get unrealistic, and so the worry slows at that point. In words, it is tougher to see that, and so it keeps going and snowballs.
(Also note that it’s only a hypothesis - the researcher’s name is Borkovec.)

I guess… isn’t the underlying assumption of all of that is that if you were to see the irrationality of it, you would decrease the anxiety? Is that actually the case?

Just that it would decrease the likelihood of it snowballing into an avalanche, as is characteristic of GAD given that the level of worry is pretty remarkable. A client of mine from a little over a year ago who had textbook GAD quoted Anchorman, “Well, that escalated quickly” to describe it (which I greatly appreciated).
But again, this is just an idea, and maybe not one that captures everyone with GAD. The premise is that if individuals with GAD could slow their thoughts a bit before they get to the most catastrophized end-point, there could be at least some reduction in anxiety, or at least some perceived ability to act sooner within the feared timeline rather than feel powerless against the ultimate catastrophized fear.
Before “I feel sick” turns to “I’m going to have to call in sick and then I’ll get fired on the spot and I’ll undoubtedly lose my apartment because I can’t pay the rent and so I’ll have to move back home and my friends won’t want to hang out with a job-less loser and no one will love me,” they can intervene sooner and realize it won’t get to the point of no one loving them (e.g., “if I call work and tell them I am sick, am I really going to lose my job on the spot? Maybe I can explain the situation and offer to come in and see what they say, because the worst case scenario is I go in and they see that I’m actually sick and then they’ll probably just send me home”).
That sort of thing.

cognitivedefusion:

scienceofeds:

cognitivedefusion:

scienceofeds:

Behar, E., DiMarco, I. D., Hekler, E. B., Mohlman, J., & Staples, A. M. (2009). Current theoretical models of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD): Conceptual review and treatment implications. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 23, 1011-1023.

This is so hard for me to believe, for some reason. Why would thinking verbally move faster than thinking through imagery? (I know I should just read the paper. I might actually do that, hah.)

Think of it this way: in your head, describe your bedroom with words. It’s likely you’ll move through each characteristic quickly because you need to get to the next part. Bed, paint, mirror, dresser, whatever. One thing to the next, and so because you are going part-by-part you get less time to devote to each part.

Or, imagine your bedroom as an image. This way you can visually see everything, so you are not jumping from one part to the next. You can sit with each piece (in unison) for longer. You don’t have to think of one part and then the next and so on, but you can see the bed, paint, mirror, dresser, etc. all as one unit.

Does that make any more sense? The main thing is that, with images, it’s easier to spot where the line of thinking starts to get unrealistic, and so the worry slows at that point. In words, it is tougher to see that, and so it keeps going and snowballs.

(Also note that it’s only a hypothesis - the researcher’s name is Borkovec.)

I guess… isn’t the underlying assumption of all of that is that if you were to see the irrationality of it, you would decrease the anxiety? Is that actually the case?

Just that it would decrease the likelihood of it snowballing into an avalanche, as is characteristic of GAD given that the level of worry is pretty remarkable. A client of mine from a little over a year ago who had textbook GAD quoted Anchorman, “Well, that escalated quickly” to describe it (which I greatly appreciated).

But again, this is just an idea, and maybe not one that captures everyone with GAD. The premise is that if individuals with GAD could slow their thoughts a bit before they get to the most catastrophized end-point, there could be at least some reduction in anxiety, or at least some perceived ability to act sooner within the feared timeline rather than feel powerless against the ultimate catastrophized fear.

Before “I feel sick” turns to “I’m going to have to call in sick and then I’ll get fired on the spot and I’ll undoubtedly lose my apartment because I can’t pay the rent and so I’ll have to move back home and my friends won’t want to hang out with a job-less loser and no one will love me,” they can intervene sooner and realize it won’t get to the point of no one loving them (e.g., “if I call work and tell them I am sick, am I really going to lose my job on the spot? Maybe I can explain the situation and offer to come in and see what they say, because the worst case scenario is I go in and they see that I’m actually sick and then they’ll probably just send me home”).

That sort of thing.